WRITING TIPS: Copyright Basics for Writers


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ABOUT COPYRIGHTING YOUR WORK

Copyright Basics
by Heather Haliah

To copyright your work, contact the United State Copyright Office which is a division of the U.S. Library of Congress.

Here is the address and telephone number:
U.S. Copyright Office
101 Independence Ave. S.E.
Washington, D.C. 20559-6000
(202) 707-3000

This number may have changed so call your local directory.

What you should know about Copyrighting your work:

Do not believe that your work is protected from the moment you create it in a fixed form. You must copyright your work before you display your work to the public. There are different forms to utilize for various works such as screenplays, movies, recorded music, books, videos, dance performances, musicals, etc.

All you have to do is call the copyright office to request these forms. You state your address, and forms you are requesting.

The forms will be mailed free of charge. However, registration for your copyrighted work is $45. Try to keep track of your copyrighted work and store all information and titles you registered your work under in a safe place.

It is costly to trace your own work and the Copyright Office charges by the hour to locate your records.

Certain things cannot be copyrighted, and therefore, it is important to visit the Copyright Office directly at www.copyright.gov to keep up with changing trends.

An author who has written an excellent book on Copyright Basics is Tonya Evans. Her site and publishing company, FYOS Entertainment can be visited at: www.legalwritepublications.com.

ABOUT COPYRIGHTING YOUR WORK UNDER UNDISLCOSED NAMES

It is okay to copyright your work under undisclosed names. Very often pirates who infringe on people’s works can look up your content at the Copyright Offices and see what you have copyrighted. By using undisclosed names these pirates can’t get to your work which may not be officially published. If they do, you can surprise them with a copyright and infringement lawsuit for stealing your intellectual property by navigating the internet. It is easy to prove someone visited your intellectual property online, but don’t make it easy for thieves to steal your work through popularity. Popular authors often are mimicked through least likely sources.

ISBN BASICS
Obtaining an ISBN for your Books
by Heather Haliah

The ISBN is the International Standard Book Number. When you register your book anywhere, you need an ISBN for each form of your work from a soft cover book to hard cover book.

In the past, ISBN’s contained 10 digits. This has changed, ISBN’s now contain 13 digits. The middle chunk of numbers identifies the publisher, the next to last 2 digits signifies the edition of the work, and last digit is the check digit.

Distributors, booksellers and people with professional businesses that sell books must have your ISBN number to keep track of sales. However, an ISBN is not necessary for PDF guides and information.

The ISBN can be placed on the back of your book and title page to make it easier for real booksellers to fulfill orders. Ordering ISBN’s is very simple. Just contact R.R. Bowker. You may order ISBN’s in quantities of 1,10, 100, 1000. You save when you order a thousand.

Prices vary year to year so visit www.ISBN.org

or write to:R.R. Bowker, 121 Chanlon Road, New Providence, NJ 07974

NEED TO CONVERT 100 TO 1000 OLD 10 DIGIT ISBNS. VISIT WWW.BISG.ORG TO CONVERT YOUR ISBNS OR APPLY FOR SPECIAL APPLICATION AT BOWKER TO REQUEST AUTOMATIC CONVERSION FOR A SMALL FEE.

CIP & LCCN BASICS
Obtaining a CIP Listing and LCCN Number
by Heather Haliah

 

The Cataloging In Publication or CIP cataloging and the Library of Congress Card Number or LCCN is very important if you would like for your book to be available in libraries. It is best to place it right on the title page of your publication.

There are numerous libraries and this step will help you reach libraries with success. Unfortunately, self publishers are not permitted to obtain a CIP listing or LCCN. As a publisher, I was able to obtain a pre-assigned prefix with limited published titles when I became a publisher.

To acquire a CIP cataloging, visit the Library of congress: www.loc.gov

To acquire distribution of your book to libraries, visit

http://www.quality-books.com/pcip.htm

BARCODE BASICS
About the Barcode
by Heather Haliah

The Bookland EAN Bar Code is usually placed on the back a book in the left, middle or right hand corner. The ISBN Barcode allows for booksellers to be able to scan your ISBN for faster check out time and to avoid manual processing. It is also used for tracking of sales. You;ll find the ISBN number and if a book was printed prior to 2006, a 10 digit and 13 digit ISBN. The 978 code alongside the bottom of the EAN bar Code reflects that it is indeed a Bookland EAN barcode. You’ll also see 6 numbers where the first number, usually a 5, represents the United States and the 4 remaining numbers represent the retail price of the book. Some book cover designers will process the Bookland Ean Barcode on your book cover for an extra fee. If you expect your price to change, you may even request stickers with the Bookland Ean Code on the backcover. There are barcode programs to help savvy publishers create their own bar codes, but careful, if the barcodes are not properly formatted, you could wind up with thousands of unscannable books.

To request bar codes that you can generate on your own right now visit:
www.ISBN.org